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Reviews and experiences: Orly ‘rainbow flop’ color blast nail polish and Careers that ‘don’t’ fit. –

Published January 14, 2017 by AntiqueMystique1

Happy New Year to all my fellow bloggers and followers. 🙂  Yes, I know this blog post is a little crazy but I figured to bundle up all my recent experiences/ reviews into one post on here and since time is limited for me. I don’t have as much time as I once did to post until my heart’s content.  So, here we go…

My review of Orly’s “rainbow flip” or ‘flop’ rather in my case.

I love the shimmery, almost metallic/glittery hues. What I dislike about this nail polish is that it will set a person back about $7.  Orly nail polish does applies extremely unevenly, very thin, and transparent so make sure you have a TON of nail polish remover on hand because this nail polish will be an exercise in frustration and it will drip everywhere in a goopy mess the more you try to apply it. Secondly, I feel they could at least reduced the price for what you get. And as luck would have it K-Mart had only one bottle left. Not that I mind, but…

I tried to apply it and it didn’t work out for me, at least not on my fingernails. It worked okay for my toe nails, but after a while the paint wears off easily.  Would I recommend this nail polish? Possibly if it was better quality, and if it doesn’t contains nasty chemicals like formaldehyde, toluene, etc.  I have no idea what the chemical rating is for Orly nail polishes on the Environmental Watch Group website.

 

Bubble wand spiral curl curling iron and Bedhead waving iron reviews:

The Bubble wand curling iron. It actually creates spiral curls on an extremely high heat setting so be warned and don’t fry off your hair. I did try it out today on its lowest setting since it does warm up fast to the touch within 30 seconds.  And me and time management we’re still adjusting. I had plenty of time to get ready and be out the door, and perhaps I didn’t give this bubble curling iron half a chance. However, the curls it created in my hair didn’t look like the tiny, tight gorgeous spirals pictured on the box.

Uh, that’s because in advertising looks are almost deceiving, plain and simple. Oh, yeah, and photoshop adds some luster to those long spiral locks as well. Anyway, I was unimpressed for now with the Revlon’s bubble curling iron.  I feared if I tried it on a high heat setting, I’d be wearing a stocking cap to work for many years. My hair is delicate to say the least and naturally fine, so maybe that’s why it won’t work for different hair types. But what I’d like to see Revlon put out is one identical to it, but design one just like  a standard curling iron where a it will clamp a strip of hair in place so you don’t have to potentially burn any hands or fingers trying to keep a strand wrapped around the bubble shape rod.  And the heat-resistant styling glove will melt to this curling iron. It’s stated in the leaflet stuffed in the glove it’s intended purpose is just to prevent fingers from the occasional burn, but the glove itself is made of plastic. Yikes! Uhm, well, in that case, I will be extremely careful not to get my hand too close to the tip or the wand itself while I’m trying to use it.

As far as the design is concerned, it could be better made. I do like the bubble style of the curling iron though, it’s different. I do miss not having the option to clamp my hair with a standard curling iron though.

 

The bubble wand is made by Revlon and sells for about $27.00 at Wallyworld. I purchased mine when I got off work since there’s no way I could physically do the impossible and be in and out of Wallyworld in less than five minutes, manage to get through all that daytime throng people just milling around aimlessly and/ or most of the time talking and parking their shopping carts in the middle of the aisles taking up space and yet still make it to work on time.  I also did some price-comparison shopping on Amazon and with the internet tax it would have been more including shipping and handling. So, I decided to buy one from Wallyworld.

Another interesting hair-styling gadget that caught my eye is the BedHead weaver iron. This chunky-looking waving iron looks and feels too big for my needs and my naturally fine hair will thank me later that I didn’t purchase this. However, for those that love those ‘beach curls/waves’ I would highly recommend getting a Bedhead Waving iron. But I encourage those to read as many reviews as possible before making any hair styling purchase. Same goes for the aforementioned nail polish brands.

 

Careers that ‘don’t’ fit:

I thought I wanted an additional 3rd job. I sincerely believed I had what it took to get into retail and completed some applications online. Most places I didn’t hear back from. Other places like the one I recently interviewed for had some very strange replies to my job interview status follow-up. In fact, they didn’t want me visiting the store, nor calling to check up on the status of my post-interview process  like what was the standard way of doing things when actively job-searching. And back in my day (and many others) the old way of doing things is you waited one week after being interviewed and then checked back either in person, phone call, etc.

The manager’s eyes shifted away from me instantly and they pretended to focus on something else in the store and quietly, yet quickly told me, “We send out the ‘auto-generated’ response email.”

And AntiqueMystique says a very bad word during the 15 minute interview: the “c” word.

Oh, forgive me, I didn’t know “commission” was politically incorrect. I unintentionally blurted out a major ‘no-no’ for this retail chain when saying that word without knowing.  They refer to commission as “progressively active something-or-other” that sounds like a string of run-on words that can be simply said in one word: Commission. The hourly rate is purely based on how much the right sale’s associate can sell clothing.

I could sense it wouldn’t work out because I can deduct a lot from a person’s mannerisms within the first few minutes I meet them. The shifty glances, unease in posture, and the fast-talking, “seems interested” when they really aren’t tell me volumes of the personality.

 

And when I am sheilded from view so that the “shoppers can shop” so I’m told. I say a very polite, “Excuse me” and pretend not to notice that I’m not what this manager wants or expects from a job applicant. In fact, I don’t come off as high pressured because that’s not me. Secondly, I’m quiet and soft-spoken. I have a physical handicap: my voice that I have no control over. If I try to speak loudly, it comes off sounding mean or angry which I’m not.  Face it, AntiqueMystique, you simply aren’t a “fit” for this retail giant.  In fact, I was relieved that I didn’t have any typical questions come up like can I afford to purchase their clothing? For God’s sake don’t ever say “No”. Say, yes and given time I can build a wardrobe. In reality, I had to put two vests on layaway from this retail store and I didn’t even breathe a word of that during the interview. I did explain that all I had was one ‘night out on the town’ dress (yes, I know, skimpy and it isn’t job interview-ish, but at least it covered me decently).  And I’ve seen their shop girls (I don’t like the PC terminology like sales associates), wore a different store’s clothing.

I’m very reserved and don’t think that showing cami-straps, bra straps, or any type of tank strap garment is fashionable, far from it. See? I wouldn’t make a good ‘fit’ for this company at all. I’m too reserved, too old-fashioned, but do try to keep abreast that this clothing retailer is for young fashion forward men and women.  I’m generally very upbeat, positive and can be out-going, but here again, that won’t always make or break a person. It’s not what you know, but who you know.

Another reason the retail part-time job wouldn’t have worked out is I do have a full-time position that pays the same.  And they promise a better hourly wage which is the old bait and switch routine. And I just don’t have the massively huge bank account nor the endless funds to purchase their over-priced clothes just to work there. The bad drawback is that I wouldn’t have been ahead in achieving my goals and financially, I’d be losing money just to work a part-time job that likely wouldn’t have panned out for me anyway. My future in retail is undecided for the present time. Thanks for liking, re-blogging and commenting, I truly appreciate it. 🙂

 

 

 

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Dead Mall series part 2: Try-ons and discounts: a customer’s perspective.

Published July 22, 2016 by AntiqueMystique1

I tried on the last I’m a Freakin’ Ray of Sunshine tank top rue21 had in stock, but didn’t get it. It was piled under a mess of other picked through tanks. Straight ahead it looked like a mini-tornado deposited a mountain of new shoes off to one side of the discounted jewelry section.

In a place like the mall time slows down. I don’t know why that is. Maybe it’s the atmosphere and that outdated shopper’s muszak. It didn’t feel but more than a few minutes had passed, and as one would guess, a whole hour had went by.

$3 clearance racks: are they a good/ not so good deal? Depends what you’re specifically looking for. Maurice’s will forever be out of my league. I say this because I simply can’t and won’t ever justify spending $44 for one pair of Jeggings when I know I can find them for $3 or less elsewhere. I did try on two pairs at Maurice’s, but for some reason, they didn’t have that certain look nor feel about them, and unlike rue 21, there’s not a whole lot of savings. But I figured while I was here I may as well try on the ‘money’s no object’ astronomically-priced Jeggings. It came as no surprise I didn’t like the fabric of Maurice’s Jeggings (no offense). The material reminded me of a pair of cheap Wally World polyester leggings that I once had and later turned around and donated because they made my sensitive skin sweat and break out. Also, the material of the expensive Jeggings felt very inferior, almost as though if I looked at them wrong they’d fall apart. And the intentionally sewn on patches felt really cheap and too light weight to withstand a single laundering. I snapped one picture of the Jeggings and called it good. I returned the Jeggings to their rightful spots and folded them just as I’d seen them.

I’m a very particular and tidy customer. Perhaps most customers don’t go out of their way to fold and/ or hang clothes. That’s why store employees get paid to straighten up after customers. I also relate to the store employees that have a trillion different tasks that must be completed all at the same time in some cases. As a customer it doesn’t bother me to walk into a chaotic mall store where clothes resemble a teenager’s bedroom and everything’s in piles, new merchandise is in the process of being organized and hung up on hooks. Did I mention the mall is like an ice box, too? That’s not a bad thing in a heatwave, but good advice: wear tennis shoes and socks and take a light weight jacket if donning shorts and a tank top. Outside it was  very muggy so the air-conditioning was a welcome relief.

A few days ago I tried on a very cute black cut out lace crop top and there weren’t too many left in stock. If you ask for another size it’s whatever is already on the floor. Stuff gets re-arranged on a daily basis, pretty much. At first, I couldn’t find these black crop tops in their usual spot at rue 21. I gravitated to a rack of jeans and placed on top were the black crop tops folded over sandwiched in with the white tank tops. I found my size and compared it to the xs “I’m a Freakin’ Ray of Sunshine” tank. They were both adorable, but I thought in terms of pick out just one. I opted for the black crop top.

I really can’t stand the feel of rayon, but also tried on a cut out v-neck black top. I could already see a few problems with the v-neck rayon top not staying in place and constantly tugging on those cut out straps to adjust them would just annoy me. Rayon top went on the rack of rejected clothing even though it was discounted at $3. I found three pairs of discounted jeans. And even though one pair is missing the front fly button I plan to sew on an antique glass button and call it good. 🙂

What’s with all the holes in the knees and the shredded look? It seems to be in vogue nowadays and in all the mall stores the Jeggings and jeans look alike. However, the material differs greatly from store to store.

Won’t I get cold once winter hits? Nah. I have a few more normal jeans without the distressed look to them that I picked up for 29 cents when at the thrift store. I really need to get on the ball and sort through all of my clothes again that no longer fit and/ or that I no longer wear and donate them. I try to do this often whenever I buy a new article of clothing, then donate my gently used stuff.

It was super busy in rue 21 and I’ve come to the conclusion it’s a very popular store with young and old alike. And the deals are better than Old Navy, not that I’m bashing their clearance items, but a lot of their tops and jeans don’t fit petite customers. The extra small and small clearance section in Old Navy consisted of no more than two tank tops, one large sweater even though the garment tag stated size small, and then it jumped into the medium and large misplaced clothes. Everything was slim pickings in Old Navy. When I stepped into Old Navy it’s warm in that store that its unbearable after a few minutes and it reeks unpleasantly of lingering mildew which is gross. But the mall is quite old so perhaps it has a lot to do with the ventilation system not working right.

On my stroll I passed by a outdoor/running/ jogging store that was having a ‘going out of business’ sale. That’ll make store #4 that’s closed down in the mall. The empty retail space sits forlorn with no renters. Yet, there’s a Hobby shop that recently opened dedicated to airplanes, model trains and nothing else it seems like. I don’t expect them to do booming business and look for them to close their doors in about two months because there doesn’t seem to be any interest, for one. And two, everybody’s too caught up in their Pokemon-Go craze and other social media.

Texting, chatting on the cell phone, gazing at an iPad—it seems to take up half the food court. I packed my lunch and had a fruit salad and one Gala apple. I don’t dine at the mall anymore because all the pre-processed food will leave a person feeling hungry afterwards likely due to the MSG. However, the pizza looks good, but I stayed true to my ‘no diary’ and no cheese diet. That, and I’m allergic to yeast and enriched flour products anyway. And the city water is fluoridated, so naturally I packed my distilled water.

Nobody at the mall socializes in person anymore, or if they do, they’ll glance at their cell phones every two minutes, update their Facebook status, post a selfie, then forget what they were talking about. The only time I removed my cell phone was to take pictures for my dead mall/ fashion/ clothing blog series on here. I don’t do social media except when I’m at home and/or blogging, tweeting stuff out.

As always, thanks for liking, re-blogging, sharing, tweeting, commenting. I truly appreciate it. Stay tuned for more. 🙂

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

No point looking at life in the rearview mirror: part 1 of my dead mall series.

Published July 20, 2016 by AntiqueMystique1
Bling current fashion lep print komono and skinny jeans 7-19-2016

Editorial correction: kimono. Bling! store in mall.

“I finally look human,” was my thrilled reply while examining the sale’s associate’s finished results.

I was nearly moved to tears. The friendly Dillard’s sales associate at the makeup counter said I had a very nice, fair complexion after I told her I thought my tattoos looked terrible and how embarrassed I am by them. And for the first time in twenty-three years I felt like I was fifteen all over again before I made the lifetime mistake of inking my skin.

I gazed in amazement at my arm. I was so blown away by how the estee lauder double wear foundation makeup is very good, if not terrific. I had ventured into Dillard’s to find some Derma-Blend makeup, but was told to try Sephora in another city. Traveling long distance is out of the question. I have seen Derma-Blend sold on Amazon and I might have to order some. And another helpful Dillard’s employee recommended I try applying some red makeup over my tattoos first to hide the blue tone, then finish off with the skin-tone makeup.

I left Dillard’s feeling a boost of hope for the inexpensive route of hiding my hideous tattoos. Those that don’t me would likely think, “What’s the big deal? Everybody pretty much sports tattoos nowadays. It’s fashionable.” I will have to disagree. I view my tattoos as being one of those lifetime regrets.

I wouldn’t say I was a trend-setter back in my 80’s generation, per se, and I’m sure I wasn’t the first to have inked her skin at sixteen. I did it much to my parent’s dismay and worry. I didn’t have very many good role models aside from my straight-laced typical 80s parents throughout my teens to look up to. My older sister was the first to get a tattoo on her arm when she was a teenager and it made a bold statement. Perhaps a part of me was highly impressionable although she strongly advised me not to get a tattoo because I’d later regret it. She turned out to be right about that. I do regret mine.

And the therapy sessions I had at sixteen (per my request), turned out to be a nightmare and it was through my [then] new therapist they told me how to get a tattoo as a way to “Rebel against your parents,” Up until this point at sixteen I never dreamed to do that and now regret putting my parents through a lot of unnecessary grief.

Should-have, would-haves and could-haves… like my college instructor told me three years ago, life is too short and we shouldn’t live in the past since we can’t change it. And they’re right about that. All we can do is move on and live life to its fullest.

Was I rebellious at sixteen? Well, if you constitute spoofing my parent’s rules in a comic book as a form of being out of hand, then no. I did push the envelope growing up, but did so through my unique, mismatched fashion. I was a trend-setter in that regard. I liked to make outdated fashion statements, but was quiet most of the time. I wasn’t very out-spoken at sixteen. I took out my emotions through drawing or I’d wear the heavy metal bracelets and pair those with the most gaudy 70’s bell bottoms I could find in thrift stores. I wore something very similar to platform boots (the originals straight out of the 70s) that zipped up mid-calf and I bought a second-hand 60’s fringe hippie vest that I just loved. So I clashed with my fashion statements. If that’s the only terrible thing [pre-tattoos] I could have ever done to rebel against my parents, then it’s laughable by today’s standards and hardly worth a mention.

But for that moment standing there in Dillard’s I got a little teary-eyed seeing my skin clear for the first time, and this was a real self-esteem booster for me. I felt alive again like I was no longer tied to that dark chapter of my long gone teenage years.  I was impressed how well the sale’s associate did trying to match the colors with my fair skin tone using only dark makeup they had on hand in the store. I was very pleased seeing no hideous tattoos covering my arm. I did all my tattoos at sixteen under the wrong advice of one very misguided adult therapist, by the way.

At sixteen I had erroneously believed that all therapists were well-trained in their chosen field and knew how to reach teenagers and help them find healthier alternatives, like say, for example, temporary tattoos that wash off with soap and water. Needless to say that wasn’t even an option nor did it ever come up in any of my one-on-one therapy sessions. And I was proven very wrong about my [then] teenage assumptions about therapists and it only further solidified my distrust of adults around me growing up.

And for a brief time I had my nose pierced as a teenager. This is, until my dad’s grandmother saw it and asked me to promptly remove it. It simply shocked her and my intentions weren’t to do that since body piercings were relatively a new trend that was taking a slow hold by around…oh, I’d say, 1993 or thereabouts. I see it didn’t catch on until around 20o8 or so.

My nose piercing didn’t last long, thankfully. But what I would like to address is the possibility of having a deviated septum (nasal cavity damage) as a result of nose piercings and the inability to fight off colds. Speaking for myself I tended to come down with colds often when I had my nose piercing. Oh, yeah, and there’s a good chance it could become infected no matter how well the piercing is kept clean, which is another good reason why I took it out and let my nose heal.

I was amazed I made it into adulthood. And nowadays I would love to re-capture the good parts of my teen years since not all of them started off bad. (And wouldn’t we all want to re-live our good moments?) 🙂

If you made it to adulthood without doing drugs consider yourself among the lucky ones that made the right decision to just say no. Other than having been a transfer student most of my teen years, and moving around a lot back in the day, the adjustments were always rough on me. New town, new clique of school kids. Oh and did I mention, a massively large student body population at each new school? Yep, and then come in the bullies though they made up the average annoyances I had to put up with at school, minus the private and religious schools where I had thrived.

Now bullies of my generation were more of the “I pick on everybody!” type. They didn’t exclude the popular kids. And the popular kids were these very stuck up, aloof teenagers that would move to another table in the cafeteria just to ignore the unpopular kids (yours truly included). I had never seen this strange new social pecking order in any of the private and religious schools I had attended. It happened quite a bit in the public school systems. And I found making friends and maintaining friendships nearly impossible for me since my family moved around quite a bit which means I’d lose contact eventually.

I didn’t come from a military family. But wherever there was better pay, nicer neighborhoods and a chance at a better education, that’s where my family would re-locate, and believe me, being a transfer student comes with large amounts of stress that I was unprepared to deal with at sixteen. I was in all sense of the word, ‘lost’. I came from a very nice, one classroom religious school where the older students tutored the younger students when the teacher was busy only to be thrust back into public school for the umpteenth time. Arrg!

Public schools never worked for me. I wasn’t delinquent as a juvenile. I wasn’t a trouble maker. I didn’t sass back to the teachers. I didn’t skip school. I didn’t cheat on my homework. I had mountains of homework that took me from five in the evening until five that next morning to finish. I ran on maybe one hour of sleep on any given weekday. My hair and makeup were slapped together and most mornings I’d leave the house on an empty stomach and take my vitamins without breakfast just so I could make it to the bus stop on time. I looked strung out because I was exhausted. There’s such a thing as overworking oneself and that’s what I did to in order to make the grade. I guzzled soda like coffee back then. I still ate lunch and dinner and I skateboarded for entertainment, too.

I was held back here and there a few grades. And as I became older and the school kids were younger than me and this created a lot of friction. I had a studious attitude that was often misinterpreted as having a small chip on my small shoulders, when in fact, I wasn’t. I had very little patients for my younger peers immaturity and sarcasm and I take life very seriously.

Yet when I was in the religious schools, my grades improved by leaps and bounds, and I’d like to hope, my nature was relaxed and laid back. I got along great with the religious kids, no problems there. I was in familiar surroundings in those religious schools, I’d say much like the mall with their outdated floors, interiors, stores—maybe not so much the merchandise and music stores are a thing of the past just about.

And my biggest addiction growing up as a teenager has always been music. It was whatever the music industry cranked out: heavy metal, thrash and speed metal like Metallica and Anthrax I simply loved. Surprisingly, I was never a fan of Guns n’ Roses (or ‘GnR’ for short back in my day) because I felt Axl Rose was mean to make his fans wait two hours before the concert began, and he threw adult temper tantrums and would storm off the stage mid-set. Although, I did find that two of their songs grew on me, “Civil War” which was popular on the radio in 1990. I especially related well to actress Anne Ramsey’s intro: “What we’ve got here is failure to communicate, and some men you just can’t reach.  So you get what we had here last week. Which is the way he wants it, well, he gets it. I don’t like this anymore than you do,”

And I liked the song “Used to love Her,” which my mother hated due to its questionable lyrics. It was actually about Axl’s dog. And neither me nor my older sister were allowed to have the Guns n’ Roses 1988 album Lies, Lies, Lies.I also liked two of [Glenn] Danzig’s songs: Twist of Cane and Mother. Those grew on me.

I did like two songs by Megadeth, “Symphony of Destruction” and “Hanger 18” which were popular on the radio in 1991. I didn’t discover Iron Maiden until I was fifteen and then stumbled upon their eary stuff which lead me to discover W.A.S.P. (another 80s heavy metal/ shock rock category band). I still have all of my original Iron Maiden and W.A.S.P. LP’s from the 1980s. And I was a huge Def Leppard fan, especially of their earlier stuff. Back in 1993 I never did find a copy of their 1982 song, “Me and my Wine”. I loved the video of this song so much and later was told it could be on their High and Dry album. Hey, that’s like, totally awesome, but which release? :/ The U.K. version or was it ever on the U.S. release? I have said LP and can’t find it. I managed to find it on youtube years later so that sufficed.

If it’s heavy metal, rock, hard rock, classic rock, 80s power ballads, then I enjoy it all pretty much and managed to find it on LP as well. And I also loved all those Ronco and K-Tel produced disco albums as a teenager. I have a few of them still. I didn’t buy into the “it’s the devil’s music,” that was strongly coming from the religious community back in the day and a lot of 80s parents were decrying the same thing, “It’s the devil’s music.” Yet, we’d have this tug-o-war power struggle going on: parents give a little, and their kids will take it a mile. And when we’ve reached this new millennium, our musicians are now veterans in their own right.

And growing up we weren’t joined at the hip with cell phones, texting devices, nor Facebook. I think that would have annoyed me as a teenager because I like actual in person chatting. As teenagers we hung out at the mall and made fun of the mall walkers. That’s something that’s a lost pastime; teenagers hanging out at the mall thanks in large part to those darn thug mobs that ruined it for this upcoming generation. Growing up cell phones (at least from what I remember them resembling) were likened to those satellite car phones that you might glimpse in a 70’s action movie and they looked like old-fashioned landline phones.

Any good deals on the sale racks? A few, but I mostly came for the purpose to price the makeup to cover my tattoos with. Old Navy has a large clearance section, but looks are deceiving. Their price differences aren’t much of a huge savings, but they do have some awesome wardrobe ideas. Now the skinny jeans and/ or jeggings I stumbled upon in Maurice’s and Bling! are way out of my league. I can’t justify these store’s prices. I believe from Maurice’s their jeggings were $34.99-42.00 for one pair. From Bling! a similar pair of distressed skinny jeans will cost around $42.00.

And they had a rayon leopard print kimono for $32.99. That’s an outrageous price I thought. It’s totally awesome on the mannequin in the store window, but looks like someone had just cut out a large bolt of fabric from Jo-Ann’s and draped it over the shoulders and didn’t bother to stitch it together correctly. Not complaining about the lack of shape or form of said kimono (shown in picture) because I realize they’re supposed to have a loose drape with that style, but it resembled an over-sized poncho in my eyes, and on me when I tried it on, I practically swam in it and it was a size small. It appeared to be one of those ‘one size fits all’ garments. I don’t believe I wasted the cell phone battery to snap a picture. I’m not much of a selfie person. What else did I see? I didn’t go to any other stores, but might pop into Books-a-Million and price their comic books. I still buy on occasion comic books. Superman was my favorite and so was Tales from the Crypt, which let’s face it, those were some creepy comics that were a throw back to the 1950s E.C.’s creepy comics that were re-issued in 1990. I had a whole stack of them and my parents threw them away because they felt like they were too graphic. Thanks for liking, re-blogging, sharing, tweeting, reading and commenting. I always appreciate it. Stay tuned for more dead mall series. 🙂

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

My rue 21 “mini”-haul

Published July 19, 2016 by AntiqueMystique1

Copy of tan or taupe high heel boot cage type 7-18-2016

It’s not a terribly big haul but I do believe this brings me up to thirty-one pairs of high heels now. To be honest I don’t know what to call these taupe-colored…sandals? Gladiator boots, high heels? (pictured). They remind me of a cowboy boot “heel” and a sandal since their open-toed. And maybe they fall into the chunky high heel “caged” category which are hugely popular right now. I bought the last three discounted pairs rue 21 had in stock and I’d like to thank the manager who went above and beyond and reserved the heels, faux black leather studded purse that was missing one stud so it was deeply discounted, along with a dress and one pair of earrings. I truly appreciate them doing that for me. 🙂

Do you ever carry a ‘want’ list in your purse and/ or wallet? I do. Do I ever come out of a store with exact said things on my list? Nine times out of ten, no because I find great deals that I change my mind about three or four times.

Is it taupe or “top”?

That’s a tongue twister for me to pronounce the word taupe when trying to describe a certain color of sandal or high heel. I’d always say “tan” or beige. But I’ve seen some people refer to the color as ‘taupe’. So, I bought two pairs of “taupe” open-toed heels and one pair in faux suede black with zippers.

cranberry high heel boot3 sideview

Now about this faux suede and the “man made” imported materials I found out is actually polyester, which for the price I don’t mind wearing on my feet and I don’t mind carrying a fringe faux suede purse either as long as it’s not a shirt, shorts, underwear, or a tank top smothering my body. I always double-check those garment tags before I try on clothes nowadays. Can’t escape the man-made imported footwear, but hopefully with care these high heel sandals/ boots will last me quite some time and I think they accentuate any outfit whether it be for summer or early fall.

And I found some feather hoop earrings for $2. These are awesome and I love that they don’t pull down on the earlobe like some other heavy hoop earrings do. These feather hoop earrings are semi-light weight and they pair well together with just about any outfit. I would have loved to buy a few more pairs but will wait until another time since I believe these to be a delicate earring so when wearing these, be gentle with them. Again,  a lot of the mass-produced inexpensive jewelry made nowadays isn’t sturdy. That can be said of necklaces which is why I only shopped rue 21 for a few necklaces last year. I still have the gold bangle bracelets I bought a year ago.

I came home with a stylish pair of pink framed aviator sunglasses. And on rue 21’s $3 sale rack I tried on and fell in love with a tiny cropped jean jacket that has intentional rips and shreds on the front. Why did this tiny jean jacket call to me? It was the last one on the half-price rack. Get it, try it on, take a “selfie”. Back my day we just called it “take a picture” since the term “selfie” is a new word for this millennium. Just like “Bestie” never existed in my day. We used to just say “best” friends and never abbreviated anything. Going to the mall has been a learning experience for me and I never fail to learn something new whether it’s a new term, word, phrase, etc. Let me state that I have not been living under a rock. I very seldom see and/ or hear these new millennium phrases used everyday. Yes, that makes me so ‘old school’. 😀

I do plan to revise my want list (again for the umpteenth time). When shopping for clothes: don’t go based on online descriptions like for example, if they say, “Model wears a size ¾,” or model wears a size 0 and don’t provide height or weight measurements, go to the nearest rue 21 and try on the garments. I found from past online shopping at home experiences eons ago that trying to base my size compared to a model is vague and impossible.  In fact, to avoid disappointments don’t compare your size to what the model wears. Always try on the garments. I was very fortunate enough there was plenty of sizes of the same garments that I tried on. Some rue 21 clothes will run very true to size, so I’d recommend going one size up if the garment has no stretch to it, especially if its all cotton shorts/jeans and/or jeggings.

I seem to gravitate to the new jeggings that rue 21 just rolled out. However, it’s not so much the $29.99 price that drives me away entirely, it’s the fabric’s rayon content. Rayon is a synthetic that is chemically produced, so it’s kind of like a strand of fiber, but still very much man made fake fabric. Other than that, I love the ripped and shredded jeggings at rue 21. My only small complaint is that some jeggings don’t have functioning front pockets, either. I like to carry pocket change and my shopping list on my person so I don’t have to dig through my purse to find either one of those items.

The “Premiere” brand skinny jeans that have patches on the legs and holes they rock, hands down! 🙂 I love them and am very happy with how they look and feel and the fabric content I believe is cotton/spandex blend. 😀 These skinny jeans will set a person back about $11 total and can be found on rue 21’s sale’s racks. My only complaint is the leg opening down the calf could have some more ‘give’, but I haven’t noticed too much uncomfortable calf pain nor numbness from wearing said jeans. Yet again, I haven’t worn them for long periods since its been oppressively hot outside.

Surprisingly this year I’m not a fan of rue 21 shorts. I was drawn to an orange pair of crocheted shorts, but when I seen they were made of polyester I put them back on the rack without even trying them on. That, and I don’t think I’d look all that cool in a pair of crocheted shorts. I am a fan of acid-washed denim since it was first popular back in the mid-1980s. But there’s something different about the new acid-washed articles. Sure, they look like the original acid-washed ‘kind of’, but…. nothing beats the 1980s acid-washed look. It looked fantastic when it was in style and still stands the test of time even nowadays.

But I had a difficult time finding jeggings in the acid-washed style or any kind of jeans that fall in that specific category. The t-shirts really didn’t appeal to me, yet the funniest t-shirt I saw on rue 21’s website stated, “I’m a freakin’ ball of sunshine!” with an image of a happy face. I couldn’t find that particular shirt in stock locally. I don’t know what it was about the phrase or the image that made me laugh. Another funny saying I saw on a tank top stated, “Suck it up, Buttercup” and that was from a year or two ago.

At first I didn’t think I’d find anything at rue 21, but as I looked around my mall a few times I simply couldn’t find any other store that appealed to me. I kept returning to rue 21 due to their reasonable prices and better selection of garments that do fit me quite well.

The most mind-numbing, beyond boring, and annoying store I ventured in…

was Ross. This is a copy cat of Marshall’s and basically what it is like rack after rack of shoddy made cheap garments where the sizing is never alike. For example, you could compare two size smalls together, and one of them will be barely held together at the seams. That, or the color and size will be way off the mark. And the prices at Ross are higher than in the other places. I’ve only been in Marshall’s one time and that was enough for me. They wanted $8 for a pair of skinny jeans with a broken fly zipper. Unless you’re a seamstress, good luck sewing in a new zipper. Most basic sewing machine’s can’t handle sewing in a zipper through heavy fabric like denim. And Marshall’s pricing was confusing and outrageous I thought. Suggested manufacture’s retail price was so high and Marshall’s prices weren’t much different, either I thought.

And please don’t get me started on Dress Barn next. Even though they were closed the time I went, I took one look at their dress forms in the windows and it was more cheap garments that appeared to be picked over from various chain stores and/ or returned merchandise that nobody wanted.

“I am so going back to rue 21,” I told myself. I wasn’t expecting to find anything special at rue 21, but wound up finding my next outfits for fall and winter for about $34.00. I did step into the Buckle and was amazed to see no more shredded jean jacket vests. I considered myself extremely lucky to purchase the two that I had when they had them. I don’t particularly shop at the Buckle because it’s extremely expensive. The prices turns me away almost instantly and they don’t have anything in stock in my size as far as jeans go. I still consider the Buckle to be a rich person’s store.

And Sears? Eh, that day I wore my strappy Qupid high heels I ventured in there and my stride was very slow over those buffed cracked old tile floors. Sears is washed up, a has been actually. They have no different sizes stocked in their shoe department and the prices of their footwear is horribly over-priced. I thought to myself I could go to K-Mart and get stocked up on three pairs of fashionable fall boots for about $20 and earn reward points. And Sears undergarments were very standard “one size fits all” that I didn’t see my size in on the racks and it looked very picked over. There was one person fielding phone calls and that was it.

I left and walked in those tiny high heels for a little bit, then went straight home to take them off. High heels can cause the tendons that run down your foot to become weak, and over time, ruin your feet completely. I don’t wear high heels for long periods of time or even everyday. If you plan to do a lot of mall walking be sure to wear tennis shoes or something very comfortable.

I loved the compliments I received that day don’t get me wrong about my Qupids, but if the same compliment is repeated to me over and over by the same young man then it just annoys me. I was told that the young man would have probably wanted to ask me out on a date with me wearing said high heels which made my legs appear taller and my feet extremely small. I suspected such, but young men don’t know what they want when they’re twenty-something. And an older woman might be more interested in finding a down to earth, relaxed mature older man close to her age anyway.

Thanks for liking, sharing, re-blogging, tweeting, commenting. As always I truly appreciate it a lot and special thanks goes out to all my new subscribers. 🙂 I will keep updated with any future fashion/ hauls as well.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Dead Malls Everywhere.

Published March 5, 2016 by AntiqueMystique1

I have nothing against malls. In fact, I find mall-walking very fun compared to the marathon ‘out-of-breath’ beat the huge crowds that mill around Wal*Mart all day long. The reason why I don’t shop at Wal*Mart and haven’t for quite a while: parking spaces can’t be found. Secondly, it is crowded day and night. All of Wal*Mart’s merchandise is bottom of the barrel Made in China cheap and/ or chemically perfumed articles of clothing/ jewelry. But then so is about any place you shop.

As I approach any store my sense of smell is heightened. I usually know right off the bat if the dizzying whiff of ‘chemical’ or a plastic odor hits my nostrils is going to repel me or not before I even pass through those metal detectors. And I can get a general summary that my sinuses will love me back in the worst possible way for the entire evening and that means a migraine headache.

I am super-sensitive to certain smells and various plastics. If I linger looking at the garment tag instead of the price tag, it doesn’t mean I’m picky. I’m checking to see what materials the garment is made of. If there’s a large percentage of polyester, nylon or even rayon, forget it. If it comes to a pair of slim low-rise stretchy denim shorts that have 2 per cent of spandex or less, then I might consider it. Again, it all boils down to three things: a.) price. If the price is asking more than what I think the garment is worth, forget it. b.) If it reeks of chemicals/plastic or states anywhere on a tag that such garment can cause reproductive harm/ cancers in the state of California, then again, forget it. I realize a lot of man-made materials winds up in clothes. Heck even recycled bottles make up the garment tag that sewn into it nowadays. States right on the tag. And with all this outcry over how bad plastics are in ours daily lives, especially since plastics continually leech out toxins into our beverages and foods, the last thing I’d ever want to do is bound myself in polyester or any plastic ‘blend’. Modal is just wood pulp. Yep, essentially paper but its used as a filler because its so cheap to turn into a synthetic fabric but won’t hold up well to getting wet at all.

I’m at probably one of the last 20th century icons that’s seen just about every generation; the mall. But what makes all these malls dead nowadays? And what gems did I bring back from my own day at the mall? Pictures. A few of them and I even wrote down the prices of the items I looked at. I really should do some ‘then and now’ comparisons to show the very bleakness of what became of most malls (some struggling, others since closed and demolished).

But for now, the familiar stores struggle to hang in there. The ones that have made it through the 2008 ‘second’ Great Depression (as I term it) are Claire’s, Victoria’s Secret, Sears (which is really dwindling nowadays in 2016). I saw one browser and no sales clerks asking me every two minutes, “Can I help you find something?”

Yep, something’s wrong here.

And in Dillard’s forget it. No sales clerk even approached me my whole five minutes I was in there looking at their polyester garments. Prices were low on a few items, but not much different than Sears (Roebuck and Company).

I assume my resurgence for my local mall was like touring through a living history museum. For one, the interior and exterior hasn’t changed much (if at all) since the mall was built somewhere in the late 1970s/ early 80’s. Secondly, there used to be a second mall that went up (don’t know what year), but it was on its last leg in 1993, and most stores that were in there originally went bust. There was a lot of dead space, lack of any interior design. There was a fitness gym that went in, then closed down, and the last store to actually be in there was a place called Tuesday Mornings, and by 2010 or so, they ceased all business. The space sits abandoned. The large portion of the second mall now houses a dollar store, and on the other side of is a tack and saddle shop that’s been in the same location for ages. The second mall also housed a movie theater before the interior was re-vamped to expand the dollar store. Before renovations ever began there used to be one over-priced fabric/sewing notions store that never re-stocked their shelves. There was one popcorn place in that second mall and one very itty bitty bead store where a lady sold beads individually and they weren’t cheap. Oh, and can’t forget about the single payphone right in the middle of the second mall. From what I heard about the second mall and why it went under was due to its competition and bad design flaws. It was extremely hard to find the only entrance and exit to the second mall.

So the only remaining mall wins out, and at some point, was a victim of the changing times. Teenagers aren’t allowed to stay past a certain time on Fridays or the weekends. I can understand wanting to make the mall a safe place for family-orientated people to congregate and (hopefully) buy and/or eat at the food court. There’s only five food places in the food court: soft-baked pretzels, pizza, Taco John’s, Asian food, and a cookie place. And its  nothing I’d want to snack on since I’m a strict Vegetarian. A slice of pizza is $3.99 and that’s without a combo or a drink.

Families are some of the very last folks out there that might have some extra money to burn. But again, everyone of all income brackets have to hang onto their money. Mall shopping is nearly a thing of the past thanks to Amazon and other online retail outlets. This practically cuts out the need for the middle man; the physical brick and mortar store to go pick up said item(s) that are ordered. Why go there when you can shop at home and have it delivered to your doorstep?

There’s something ‘dated’ about every mall and it’s no different. If you ever happen to watch a Youtuber’s channel  ThisIsDanBell, he takes you (the viewer), on some spooky and downright accurate ‘memory lane’ tours of America’s deadest malls. You can check out his Dead Mall Series. It’s worth a look see. He runs a close second with Adamthewoo. Adam the woo also goes on urban explorations. Sometimes hilarious and both Youtubers are quite the historians on the locations they film. And then there’s Exploring with Josh, a young Youtuber who goes exploring. And the thing that people reminisce about and is highly requested: malls, abandoned amusement parks, abandon buildings, abandoned schools, etc. And malls seem to be largely popular with every generation. There’s a fascination with how things once appeared, the styles, mullet hairstyles, big hair, and look over there… jeans were normal denim, not the ‘skinny’ look nowadays. Yes, I’ve seen how the 80’s acid-washed and even stone-washed look is trying to make a come back. However, it’s just not the same.

Denim of the Eighties was cotton. It did not stretch or have that luxurious feel of ‘second skin’. It was heavy, and in the summer your waistband soaked up all the sweat and didn’t allow your skin to breathe. Spandex filled that ‘second skin’ in the 80’s/90’s and looked better than the crappy-made polyester leggings I run across far too often. I shouldn’t be downing leggings since I own two *cotton* pairs myself, it’s when they are near see-thru, very thin, or too thick that makes wearing them uncomfortable. Denim of today is mixed with a large polyester content, spandex (about 1-2 %), modal (tree pulp) and I’d almost say tree poop which would be no different, Viscose (again, another tree poop– eh, pulp/paper byproduct), ‘other materials’ that don’t state what ‘other’ includes. And the list goes on.

We remember the sights, sounds, smells, excitement, and Dan Bell puts a lot of special effects and great care in his videos. Adam the woo, and Exploring with Josh are equally good with giving the viewer a strong sense of being there with them on their journeys.  Sometimes there’s a clip of vintage TV commercials, sometimes a sound-track playing in the back ground with that vintage ‘era’ mall/grocery shopping music (kind of like elevator musik) was back in the day. And Dan Bell has inserted in one of his clips of an eerie sounding vintage PA announcement of specials and sales going on store wide while zooming into a closed department (anchor) store. All of their channels are well-worth checking out. They’re awesome. Yet it’s sad to see some of the last time capsules rotting away or being sold at auction where any given mall’s fate will likely be with a wrecking ball.
Forget re-habbing these malls for the ‘hipster’ generation. There’s no stores nowadays that would appeal to me unless upgrading your cell phone or some other techno device every two weeks is in vogue and plays a vital role in one’s life.

Who needs three cell phone stores in a mall? I assume this is what a hipster store is all about, and if it is, then it bores me to tears simply because I don’t see how mall cell phone stores make enough to cover the cost of rent. I imagine mall rent has to be extremely astronomical. Secondly, technology is good, but it goes overboard when all I see are boring cell phone stores and cute little cell phone ‘bling’ (accessories) that serve no actual purpose other than to show off and look cute. There’s a cell phone store on every street corner just about.

I look just like I time-traveled from 1989, albeit my jeans are skinny (modern), my jacket and shirt are ‘pulled together’ goodies bought second-hand. I waltz into Sears and it’s like a ghost town. I’m waiting to hear an intro to The Good, The Bad, and The Ugly blare out of their PA system and hope a tumbleweed crosses my path. It wasn’t that dramatic, but it was eerily silent and reminded me of that 80’s film where a meteor wipes off everybody on the planet, (those unfortunate enough to have been outdoors when it hit), and yet, everyone that remained inside survived. If you ever get a chance to see that film (and the name of the title escapes me at the moment), it would be liken to what I pictured a dead Sears store would look like during an apocalypse or even nowadays.

 

So when I tired of taking a “selfie” and another picture of that same old, cracked, asbestos-tile mall floor that’s standard in almost all mall designs, I walked the full length back to browse in Claire’s and returned to the [Brass] Buckle. The Buckle is one of those things on my bucket list (if I ever sit down and actually write one up on actual paper, that is). It wouldn’t be a high priority ‘to-do’ thing, but I did miss out shopping there the first time around when it was still a new designer clothing chain and a very “Preppy” teen store. Not to mention so over-priced even for the 80’s that I never stepped foot inside of one until decades later. Originally the “Brass Buckle” never did have a boho fashion/skinny jeans/ shredded vests, shredded jeans, or shredded jean jackets back in the eighties. They had very straight-laced, high-end designer clothing aimed at rich kids and their parents that could afford to charge it to their credit cards. Somewhere I have a vague memory the Brass Buckle had a paper punch card kind of like a shopper’s reward card is nowadays. I was just reminded of that the day I was at the cashier counter.

But here again, at one time I could never have fathomed me waltzing into a Brass Buckle store now years later. Times have changed. And thankfully the styles have moved away from the plain and somewhat boring fashions for teens of the late 80’s/90s. I say boring because everything was pin-stripe t-shirts, normal jeans, some acid-washed styles minus the rips or shreds in the material. There was no tight long sleeve shirts, fringe vests, Hurley [brand] attire, or even form-fitting shirts like there’s an avalanche of nowadays.

Everything now appears to be boho-clothing, beach/ summer wear, thongs (flip-flops), sandals, hats, sunglasses, shirts, tops, tanks, shorts, Daisy Dukes, acid-washed (the second generation) that still kind of sorta resembles something that looked like original acid-washed did back in the Eighties. Oh, yeah, the rock stars back then also wore acid-washed clothing so it wasn’t strictly for the young, but even the older generation could wear acid-washed denim with style.

And that’s what my eyes fell on, two denim vests. The prices would make one shrink back in fear. But the friendly sales team at the Brass Buckle would make you think otherwise. And they do offer law-away plans, too which was surprising considering they were at one time, a very popular clothing store. I suspect though this isn’t the case anymore. There was maybe two other shoppers in there when I was there as opposed to the place being packed on any given week night years prior. But that’s a sign of the times, as the adage goes. Trends are now mass-produced straight from China, and it’s “Better hurry while the offer lasts,” kind of deal.

Hope you enjoy the pictures. Thanks for reading, re-blogging, sharing, tweeting, commenting, and liking. I truly appreciate it. 🙂

Skinny Jeans- my take.

Published February 19, 2016 by AntiqueMystique1

Well, I’ve definitely seen some variations before they were commonly known nowadays as “skinny jeans”. And I’ve even bought some stretchy skinny jeans in thrift shops. But what is it about them that makes them a health concern for women? And why should it just be about us women? What about the men that wear skinny jeans? They have calves to ya’ know.  It’s the tightness, for one. And secondly, some pairs of skinny jeans can cut off the circulation in the calves so some school’s of thought will propose. And there’s the exact opposite of views that say wearing skinny jeans have no health concerns.

As a society some of us women still walk on stilts on a daily basis or throw on a pair of those to go to special events or a night club. For the inexperienced high heel wearer (yours truly) they do feel like being on stilts, and what’s worse about high heels: over time they’ll destroy your arches and balls of your feet if you wear them on a daily basis.

I didn’t have to invest in high heels to compete in an office workplace setting, but am guilty as sin for owning a few for ‘in-the-future I may be happy to own some. I’ve heard more bad than good about high heels from both women and men alike over the years, especially when shoe shopping. I’ve even watched a video where a man explains why he doesn’t like seeing women (from his cultural standpoint) to wear high heels and he explained it best something to the effect of: “High heels are meant for the woman’s husband to only see and they come straight from the brothel districts and into the runways of New York and women are conditioned to believe that to achieve beauty they must wear them.” This same man also went onto explain his thoughts about women wearing makeup– rather he was disgusted seeing women damaging their health by wearing drugstore makeup, the kind that contains a plethora of potentially carcinogenic-causing ingredients. And he went onto add that natural vegan makeup is out there. It’s pricey, but he hates hearing women say, “I can’t afford it.” His reply was simple: “Save up for it. But if you want to wear the cheap stuff, go ahead.” I thought he expressed his views alright, but here again it all depends on how one was raised.

And when high heels are paired with skinny jeans that’s a tough call. I guess nowadays the phrase is “rockin’ that —-” whatever a person wears and looks awesome.

Am I fashion expert? Nope. Do I get paid to or am I given a deep discount or freebie products to review? Nope. I just love fashion and always have even though I’m very opposed to ever shed my ‘dated’ appearance unless I feel like trying something new.

And to be honest if you skim through Amazon, the people that do give their honest reviews for a product to try out or use or get it for nearly free (I have to assume)—I simply do not have a clue how they get chosen for that. But that’s going way off the skinny jeans topic.

Skinny jeans and where to buy them: Pretty much those can be found at any retailer, thrift stores, and even the more upscale clothing stores like the Brass Buckle. Nowadays its just ‘the buckle’ or the logo “B”. I don’t get why everything has been shortened over the years, especially when it comes to retailers and their store names. Keep it like it always was and let it remain a familiar staple. That’s my take anyway.

So can a woman or man look awesome in a pair of skinny jeans? Yeah, but for a man I’d highly recommend going with Stretch F***** Jeans by Lip Service. I know, it’s kind of a punk/Goth trend in way of clothing. Had I not bought a pair of these particular jeans even though they didn’t stock a woman’s variety that I was aware of anyway eons ago, I could write an honest blog about them. I wound up buying a man’s pair of these Lip Service stretch jeans and don’t know whatever became of them. They were my favorite pair of stretchy black jeans that resembled skinny jeans I’d say it was around 2001 or 2002. And they weren’t constrictive on the circulation nor bad for the calves when worn for long periods. They were black, very durable and went through many, many, many launderings without fading too terribly much and held up quite well I recall.

Now, the only bad draw back I had about Lip Service clothing line is double check your measurements BEFORE you place an online order. And always email your measurements to a reputable place. I used to do a lot of online “Goth” shopping at Ipso-Facto, a California Goth shop. I ordered from them sight unseen and always provided my measurements. One of the last articles I ordered from them was one of the last long gauzy black corset dresses they had in stock and it was expensive!

The back and forth emailing helped to ensure the size Medium wouldn’t be so terribly tight that I wouldn’t be able to get out of said dress. It was beautiful, all black with some inset black velvet, lace up front with black ribbon ties made by Lip Service, gauzy long sleeves that went kind of off-the-shoulder. Somewhere I do have a picture of me in said dress, but where it wound up after I moved is beyond me. I might have sold off the dress on eBay when I stopped dressing Goth.

I believe if you get a pair of skinny jeans in your size, then you should be fine. And be sure to wear a shirt that covers unless you don’t mind showing your behind or underwear to the world when in public. Skinny jeans paired with the right top can look great. They can even look smokin’ (my word for totally awesome), with an old original 80’s heavy metal/ rock concert t-shirt. There was something more form-fitting about those old rock t-shirts from back in my day and even before that and they were softer cotton. I still have a few original rock t-shirts from the eighties. The re-issues of rock t-shirts and heavy metal they come out with nowadays are either too large or way too small, and if they’re a ladies Junior t-shirt then forget it. Those are too constrictive in my opinion and don’t allow the skin to breathe. And it seems like the album art has been enlarged on all of the rock t-shirts nowadays and cracks easily with a second or third washing. And it’s equally bad if it the garment contains 10 or even 75 % polyester. Polyester is recycled plastics which is why I tend to avoid buying garments if they contain polyester. And if they’re complete polyester blend like leggings for example, I don’t waste my money. I try to opt for cotton whenever I can although I realize a lot of the garments out there do contain polyester blend material and the cotton nowadays is extremely inferior, scratchy, itchy, and doesn’t soften with repeated laundering.

Hope you enjoyed this post about skinny jeans. Thanks for liking, re-blogging, sharing, tweeting, and commenting. I always appreciate it. 🙂

Bare it all part three: To Wear or not to wear? That is the question.

Published January 23, 2016 by AntiqueMystique1

It’s a debatable topic and I was curious to blog about it. Bras come in all shapes, sizes, underwires, sports bras, shelf bras, etc. And they’re all fine and pretty. But is there a link between them and cancer? I stumbled upon a fascinating natural path website addressing this very issue.

Call ’em ‘Over-the-shoulder-boulder-holders’ if you’d like. But according to one Dr. Mercola, he states that wearing a bra can pose health problems for women. “Many physicians and researchers now agree that wearing a tight fitting bra can cut off lymph drainage, which can contribute to the development of breast cancer,[1] as your body will be less able to excrete all the toxins you’re exposed to on a daily basis,”

And there’s a lot of cons with the underwire.  Dr. Mercola recommends women remove the metal wires and buy plastic bra inserts and even provides a link where to buy them in his article. I found that to be helpful, but I don’t entirely agree plastic is the way to go. Normally, I don’t re-insert anything into the underwire bras and just leave them be. Did you know that underwires interfere with the earth’s electromagnetic field and that the metal itself attracts microwaves and radio waves? According to some that have studied this correlation believe this also can pose health risks to women who wear underwire bras.

And it now got me to thinking back to the time I had emergency gallbladder surgery a few years back. In his article, Dr. Mercola also cites from a source published in 1975 about the damage bra restrictions cause to the internal organs, especially the stomach, liver, and gallbladder.

And let’s face it ladies, underwires pinch. They hurt and are very annoying. If not that then bra straps constantly require adjusting. Underwires and bras in general can interfere with the Cooper’s ligaments and lymphatic system. The purpose of the lymphatic system is to cleanse the blood, and when restricted, makes it very hard for it to drain properly. The purpose of Cooper’s ligaments helps to support the breast wall. And when this muscle is supported by a bra it breaks down and gets weak, according to some articles.

I always cut out the underwire and toss it. However, when I seen a youtube video discussing the bra vs. cancer topic a few years ago, I quit wearing bras entirely and switched over to sports bras except in the once-a-year instances.

Some women even recommend wearing a camisole or tank top underneath the clothing when heading out. And its all about personal preferences. It may seem far less sexy in appearance to what we as a society are conditioned into believing, but comfort wins out and so does the feeling of freedom. I can see why women are pitching their bras as I continued to further research this topic.

But is this a New Age/ tree-hugging fad? It almost seems to be a throwback to the Bra Burners of the late 60s, 1968 to be exact. Women did it back then because they wanted to be liberated. Nowadays women are doing it for a variety of reasons and others, not. Some prefer them or have no other choice but to wear them. Either way its a personal choice. I’m just writing this as conjecture for now. And like always I’m not an expert. I just like to bring awareness about a variety of topics no matter how controversial they may appear.

I also watched a few more youtube videos related to the bra and why its not such a good thing to wear and discovered one video by a French woman who went around to the stores and showed off various bras to get her point across why bras weren’t such a good idea from her perspective. She said something to the effect of, “If women were meant to wear bras, we would have been born with them.” The closed-captioning helped since I never learned French. This woman even had a few more videos posted in relation to health, beauty tips, I believe. If I ever find her video again I will have to post a link to it.

So there you have it. If there’s anything you’d like to see posted on my blog, please leave me a comment in the comment section. And thank you so much for  re-blogging, sharing, tweeting, commenting, and liking. I always appreciate it. 🙂