Bare it all part three: To Wear or not to wear? That is the question.

Published January 23, 2016 by AntiqueMystique1

It’s a debatable topic and I was curious to blog about it. Bras come in all shapes, sizes, underwires, sports bras, shelf bras, etc. And they’re all fine and pretty. But is there a link between them and cancer? I stumbled upon a fascinating natural path website addressing this very issue.

Call ’em ‘Over-the-shoulder-boulder-holders’ if you’d like. But according to one Dr. Mercola, he states that wearing a bra can pose health problems for women. “Many physicians and researchers now agree that wearing a tight fitting bra can cut off lymph drainage, which can contribute to the development of breast cancer,[1] as your body will be less able to excrete all the toxins you’re exposed to on a daily basis,”

And there’s a lot of cons with the underwire.  Dr. Mercola recommends women remove the metal wires and buy plastic bra inserts and even provides a link where to buy them in his article. I found that to be helpful, but I don’t entirely agree plastic is the way to go. Normally, I don’t re-insert anything into the underwire bras and just leave them be. Did you know that underwires interfere with the earth’s electromagnetic field and that the metal itself attracts microwaves and radio waves? According to some that have studied this correlation believe this also can pose health risks to women who wear underwire bras.

And it now got me to thinking back to the time I had emergency gallbladder surgery a few years back. In his article, Dr. Mercola also cites from a source published in 1975 about the damage bra restrictions cause to the internal organs, especially the stomach, liver, and gallbladder.

And let’s face it ladies, underwires pinch. They hurt and are very annoying. If not that then bra straps constantly require adjusting. Underwires and bras in general can interfere with the Cooper’s ligaments and lymphatic system. The purpose of the lymphatic system is to cleanse the blood, and when restricted, makes it very hard for it to drain properly. The purpose of Cooper’s ligaments helps to support the breast wall. And when this muscle is supported by a bra it breaks down and gets weak, according to some articles.

I always cut out the underwire and toss it. However, when I seen a youtube video discussing the bra vs. cancer topic a few years ago, I quit wearing bras entirely and switched over to sports bras except in the once-a-year instances.

Some women even recommend wearing a camisole or tank top underneath the clothing when heading out. And its all about personal preferences. It may seem far less sexy in appearance to what we as a society are conditioned into believing, but comfort wins out and so does the feeling of freedom. I can see why women are pitching their bras as I continued to further research this topic.

But is this a New Age/ tree-hugging fad? It almost seems to be a throwback to the Bra Burners of the late 60s, 1968 to be exact. Women did it back then because they wanted to be liberated. Nowadays women are doing it for a variety of reasons and others, not. Some prefer them or have no other choice but to wear them. Either way its a personal choice. I’m just writing this as conjecture for now. And like always I’m not an expert. I just like to bring awareness about a variety of topics no matter how controversial they may appear.

I also watched a few more youtube videos related to the bra and why its not such a good thing to wear and discovered one video by a French woman who went around to the stores and showed off various bras to get her point across why bras weren’t such a good idea from her perspective. She said something to the effect of, “If women were meant to wear bras, we would have been born with them.” The closed-captioning helped since I never learned French. This woman even had a few more videos posted in relation to health, beauty tips, I believe. If I ever find her video again I will have to post a link to it.

So there you have it. If there’s anything you’d like to see posted on my blog, please leave me a comment in the comment section. And thank you so much for  re-blogging, sharing, tweeting, commenting, and liking. I always appreciate it. 🙂

 

 

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4 comments on “Bare it all part three: To Wear or not to wear? That is the question.

  • When I was in my teens, twenties and thirties I always wore an underwire even though there was no “structural” (ahem) reason for it, LOL. I think I switched away from them during my forties. I have the type of shoulders that bra straps constantly slip down from, so bras were always a huge nuisance. I have no idea whether my eventual breast cancer had anything to do with either bras or underwires though, because there are so many possible variables: For example, for the 30 years prior to my diagnosis I lived in an area that some statisticians regard as a “cluster” but even that connection is disputable because very few of the cases were women who had lived in that town all their lives.

    • I thank you for sharing your story. Like you, I never seen what physical purpose bras were intended for. Oh, sure, men love to see us in them, but some become hopelessly confused when trying to get us out of them. I feel I’m just a ‘clothes hanger’ for bras. I have small shoulders and I can’t agree with you more: the straps no matter how I tighten them still slip off or show.

      Back when I was younger showing straps was a major no-no. Actually a woman would get teased, pointed to, and stared at if she didn’t adjust her attire in private. Nowadays, I see women of all ages showing their straps like its nothing and layering them with tanks, open back tank tops and plunging neck line shirts, etc. I do suspect looking back now the time I had my gallbladder removed at 35 that perhaps bra-wearing might have contributed to my gallbladder failing eventually. I also read that there’s been trouble with the stomach, liver and gallbladder and bras because they restrict and prevent the body from releasing toxins.

      I used to live in an area years ago that had contaminated soil and well water. My ex-boyfriend’s late mother was stricken with cancer and his parents had lived in the area for more than 30 years. I’m not sure if they lived in a ‘cluster’ since she was the only one stricken in the neighborhood.

      There used to be a fertilizer plant that buried their toxic waste in oil drums just up the road from where they lived. And the same plant dumped all their waste into a river nearby before they were shut down for hazardous working conditions and other pollution violations. My ex-boyfriend’s mother wasn’t sure how she was stricken with leg cancer. She survived without having it amputated and without any kind of chemo or medical treatment and never went to see the doctor after they told her they wanted to amputate her leg below the knee.

      When I met her she had had cancer for 10 years. (I met her in 2001). She used a lot of questionable topical creams one of which was Sanguine root which she claimed helped, but it also damaged the area where the cancer had formed. She passed away in 2013 from lung cancer. She never smoked in her life.

      My ex told me stories about going out to their vehicles and they would see this strange white powdery substance coating and eating away at the paint on their vehicles. He also claimed that the same white powdery substance ate through metal like battery acid. I lived with him for nine years and this was long after the plant had closed and the building and property was abandoned. I never had any ailments, neither did my ex or his dad.

      I did have a hair sample test submitted after I had been living there about 4 years and it came back showing high levels of uranium. But I also dyed my hair back then. We thought the hair sample tests were inaccurate because when the natural path asked us if I had lived in the area my whole life, I said no. We suspected that the hair samples were possibly contaminated in the lab it was sent to for analysis.

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