Rosemary and Basil: my new best herbs for hair care:

Published June 13, 2015 by AntiqueMystique1

It’s been known that using Rosemary in your home made hair shampoo will help your hair retain its natural color longer and prevent noticeable gray hairs. I sincerely believe this is true because I’ve made my own Rosemary-scented hair wash going way back to 2005. Now I haven’t used it religiously like I should have all that time simply because I was buying Rosemary in its dried form from the health food store and it became costly. Little was I aware back then though Rosemary is also an herb used in cooking and could be found at my local supermarket for a lot less. Live and learn as the saying goes.

Now Basil, other than it’s an herb used in cooking what other uses does it have, especially for the hair wash? It helps to strengthen the hair roots and shaft. Plus it gives off a nice, pleasant scent when steeping. I recently bought the last Basil plant my local supermarket had and planted it out in my garden. I did try adding it to my hair wash and used it last night with amazing results. Oh, and I have officially kicked the city water to the curb since the difference between that and using distilled are vastly different.

With city water (and ours tends to be heavily laden with chemicals, chlorine, fluoride)… yuck! And on a related note, our town voted to keep adding fluoride a few months back as well and who knows what else. All I know from drinking the city water is that it has a very faint sweet taste to it plus the chlorine will make you gag when they flush the lines. And the water is discolored and filthy on those line flushing days every so often. So not only is doing laundry out of the question, but so is consuming the city water even though the circular they send in the mail states it’s “safe to drink”… yeah, right. I don’t want anything resembling a kidney infection in my glass. That’s nasty!

And here again, irritation drove me to find a better solution. I also noticed that drinking the city water will cause pressure on the bladder (and no, I don’t have a bladder infection). I know from past experience what those are like. I suspected what I kept feeling was coming from the city water’s supply, but couldn’t be certain about it until I switched over to drinking strictly distilled water. And now I won’t even rinse my fruits or veggies without distilled water. I won’t cook without it either. I found relief at long last when I switched over to distilled and never looked back. Also, whatever is in the city water will make you get up and heed nature five times a night, so you know even when you haven’t guzzled a ten gallon oil drum of water before bedtime, and you really gotta go like a race horse, then you start questioning, “What do they put into the city tap water?”

I also noticed that my hair is healthier since washing it with distilled water instead of washing it under the tap, and ta-da! I might have answered my own question as to why my hair constantly felt brittle like all the nutrients had been sucked out of the roots and hair shaft even after spending a boat load of money on vegan hair care products with very little results. Plus I noticed a decrease of stray hairs winding up in the drain, too.

Ah-hah!
What else is alarming about the link between fluoride and city water other than conspiracy theorists will debate that it dumbs us down it can be a key to hair loss in women and not just when the elderly, but young women are experiencing this more and more. And it’s very creepy! Now I know how men must feel and balding isn’t just a gender-specific issue nowadays.

And city officials agree to keep adding fluoride to the water supply? Then again, they likely don’t consume the city water. They’re probably better off financially to have purified water trucked into their homes or have access to untreated well water. It appears this goes way back to as early as 1965 when they began adding fluoride to the city water because of its ‘anti-cavity’ properties that don’t do a thing to prevent cavities from what I’ve read and heard about on the radio.

Perhaps I’ve become heavy metal sensitive—and I mean to the extreme where if it doesn’t cause me a rash or some break out, then it will sicken me in one form or another.

Do I still want to take a leisurely swim at my local Y? They use city water and from what I’ve noticed the two times I did go there was that my beautiful hair had again turned thin, limp, brittle and a few strands wound up on my swimming suit.

The Y also requires you to shower before and after you swim which makes sense. I just wish they’d find alternatives for a water supply that doesn’t have anything less other than chlorine in the water and that’ll never happen. I might go for the exercise equipment, but I don’t know if I want to subject my hair to anymore fluoride treatments. I do care about my hair and strive to find ways to keep it naturally clean. And I never ever brush it when wet. This will cause it to tangle and break

Well, it’s a long a** cross-country hitch-hike to get to Arkansas where they supposedly have hot spring pools and the other closer location would be in Colorado. However, whether or not they pump their water full of fluoride remains unknown. I have heard health benefits of soaking in hot springs (naturally fed from spring water in the earth) and have experienced therapeutic relief in my sense of being and spirit since I’m light years away from developing arthritis at my age when I did live in Colorado.

Yes, I went way off topic, some how the fluoride, city water and my home made hair wash do correlate, I suppose.

I use fresh Rosemary picked from my garden and I also dried it when the actual plant is on the verge of dying for the winter. Then I grind it up and sometimes I’ll leave it attached to the branches. From there I keep it in glass jars with secure lids. I use mason canning jars and label what’s in it and when I harvested the plant. I also do this same thing for my Lavender and peppermint as well.

To make the Rosemary hair wash:

Bring a large pan of distilled water to a boil. Place in your dried herbs (or fresh) and keep an eye on it. As it begins to boil, the water will become dark like steeped tea. You can then add in Castile soap shavings, or omit these entirely. I have long since not relied on the soap shavings because a suspicious ingredient, “fragrance” is now added and that could mean anything toxic.

Then I turn off the burner, allow the Rosemary hair wash to cool down entirely, then using a strip of white t-shirt cloth, I stick that over the mouth of the container (held taut with a rubber band) and use a funnel to pour the contents into the container (a milk jug works) going very slow to prevent an overflow. The t-shirt material will act as a strainer if you don’t have a tiny inset sink strainer on hand. Remember to label the container and keep it in the fridge.

When you’re ready to use this hair wash just take it out of the fridge. I’ve used ice cold water (no ice cubes) on my hair to keep it soft before and it does work, but it gives me an equivalent to an ice cream headache if poured over my head too fast. Therefore, I take it slow.

I don’t know if this would work for any color-treated (dyed hair) or anybody that might have light-colored hair. For example, I have no idea if this would change the color of the hair or not. I don’t notice a difference for myself personally, but everyone’s different.

Also, just about any spice/ herbs can be used when making Rosemary hair wash. I’ve also tried adding in some Herbs de Province which have Rosemary, Sage, Lavender and other spices. Again, this mixture will need to be strained out after steeping for five minutes or so. I don’t know if there’s any added health benefit to using Herbs de Province, but it was something I used on a whim.

Oh, and I seldom follow instructions when cooking, baking, or doing anything kitchen-culinary-related and have recipes that do turn out good. And those are usually the ones I write down later and they don’t turn out as spectacular the second time around or even the third. I call them “whim” or ‘winging it’ cooking which seems to work for me.
I know I likely covered this in my first hair tutorial. I don’t remember Bernarr Macfadden ever covering using Basil or Rosemary in the hair washes he mentions in his hair care guides, so those two ingredients are likely far removed from his own hair wash recipe. Thanks for reading, liking, re-blogging, tweeting, etc. I sincerely appreciate it.

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